Setting the Stage: THE CHINESE LADY — Building a Bridge Toward Asian Visibility

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  • May 13, 2021
    7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Although TimeLine’s production of The Chinese Lady has been postponed, we can still start the conversation!

Inspired by the story of the first Chinese woman to arrive in the United States, The Chinese Lady unearths hidden history with humor and insight.

During our live online program on Thursday, May 13—in honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and on what would have been the show’s Opening Night—see scenes and learn more about this piercing and darkly poetic portrayal of America as seen through the eyes of a young Chinese woman. Plus engage in a discussion with playwright Lloyd Suh, director Helen Young, and other special guests about how this story illuminates the roots of the prejudice, bigotry, and hate facing today’s Asian-American and Pacific Islander community and inspires us to see and understand each other anew.

This FREE & one-night-only event will be presented live online.

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About The Chinese Lady

Brought to the United States at age 14 from China in 1834 by enterprising American merchants, Afong Moy is put on display so the American public can get its first view of an “authentic Chinese Lady.” Over the course of 55 years, she performs an ethnicity that both defines and challenges her own views of herself, as she witnesses stunning transformations in the American identity. As these dual truths become irreconcilable, Afong must reckon with herself and the history of her new home with startling discovery and personal revelations.

Running time is approximately 1 hour 30 minutes.

This quiet play steadily deepens in complexity. By the end of Mr. Suh’s extraordinary play, we look at Afong and see whole centuries of  American history. She’s no longer the Chinese lady. She is us.
— The New York Times